Rotk ending a relationship

3 Ways to Know when to End a Relationship - wikiHow

rotk ending a relationship

ROTK – The Return of the King . By the time Frodo moved to Bag End, where Bilbo lived, Sam had already been a frequent guest in their. It's never easy to end a relationship and, as a result, people often get into emotional trouble when they try. Bilbo Baggins is the title character and protagonist of J. R. R. Tolkien's novel The Hobbit, At the end of the story, Bilbo returned to his home in the Shire to find that In so doing, Bilbo strained his relationship with Thorin; however, the two After the quest to destroy the Ring was fulfilled in The Return of the King.

Frodo, preoccupied by his burden of the Ring, did not much openly manifest what Sam meant to him, so it appears as if his attitude has not developed. However, the contrary is true. He knew that he might die in the attempt to accomplish the quest and he did not want this for his friends, including Sam. He did not want them to suffer because of him and his unfortunate heirloom. Therefore he tried to dissuade them from the journey twice before his departure from the Shire.

First, it was during the earlier mentioned situation when he discussed it only with Sam, and then in the house in Crickhollow when the conspiracy was unmasked. Yet, he did not make much effort to deter them from coming with him. The reason for this is probably that he was afraid to go on his own. He was actually happy that he did not have to face the peril alone. This shows that the level of concern for his friends was rather low.

Had he wholly apprehended how dangerous he and the Ring was for them, he would not trouble himself with explaining it and would rather steal out secretly in the night, probably even leaving Sam behind. But he did not. However, a test of his affection for his friends came soon after, which he nearly failed. Initially it occurred to him that he could escape with the help of the Ring and leave the other three there. But then his love for his friends won and he did not abandon them. The first thing he asked, after he realized where he was, was: This may seem an insignificant exclamation, but following a month of journeying together, it reveals much about the development of his relationship to Sam and how important he has become to Frodo.

The fact that the first thing he thought about was what happened to his friend, implies that he has started to worry about him. Later, as his awareness of the danger he represents for the fellowship increased, he was becoming still more convinced that he must accomplish the task on his own. He was determined to leave instantly, without confronting any member of the fellowship.

Therefore, invisible with the Ring on, he even pretended not to take any notice of Sam whom he must doubtlessly have seen running towards him to stop him. Again he tried to persuade him not to follow. This was actually the first time Frodo spoke about his feelings to Sam. Based on this, it is obvious that he no longer treated him as a mere servant, but that Sam has become very dear to him, so dear that he would feel guilty if he died because of him.

It is interesting that Frodo did not talk about his feelings and emotions much. This may be a result of being an orphan lacking the love and interest of his relatives who raised him in his childhood 2. Probably it was never easy for him to speak about his feelings, because the people he lived with did not understand him. And it remained a problem for him even later when he moved to the Bag End and was surrounded by such loving people like Sam.

That is why he so seldom acknowledged how much Sam meant to him in comparison with this gardener who, being the simpler one, often told him how much he liked him. Instead, to show Sam how much he appreciated his services, Frodo preferred subtle but meaningful gestures. But what is more, Frodo was aware that Sam knew him so well that he could usually guess his thoughts and understand him even without words, so he did not need to affirm his love orally.

He did so only in two instances. One is the moment described above, and the other time it is after the Ring has been destroyed. Standing at the hillside of Mount Doom he said: In the past Frodo used to be very secretive, not only about the Ring, just like Gandalf had warned him, but he also used to keep all his personal affairs to himself.

Just to mention one, he often used to wander the country without anyone knowing the reasons for it, which worried his friends. He only became a little more open about his plans and intentions with Sam, after he discovered that his servant knew about the Ring as much as himself, yet never spoke a word of it. When he realized that he could rely on him and sees his determination and love, he kept no secrets from him any longer. Anyway, it would be pointless since Sam knew him so well.

So it is that Sam became the only confidante with whom he could discuss his worries and ideas. For instance, Sam was the only one to whom Frodo presented his very first piece of poetry inspired by his sorrow for the loss of Gandalf.

However, in one matter regarding his secretiveness he always remained the same—that although the Ring started to gain ever greater power over him, he never complained, never spoke about what troubled him and how much he suffered.

The nearer they got to Mordor and Mount Doom, the more Frodo was preoccupied with his burden and his diminishing hope of ever completing his quest. Were it not for Sam, Frodo would never have accomplished it, since he gave up hope completely soon after his rescue from the orc tower.

It has been pointed out that before the journey he never called him his friend. He did not consider him to be one, certainly not a close one, for his friendship with Sam was based on utility. There were other people whom he recognized as his best friends. But after what they have gone through and when Sam remained his only companion after the breaking of the Fellowship, their relationship changed.

Although to Faramir he presented Sam as his servant and gardener, in private he once named Sam: So, finally he confirmed him to be his friend, moreover, the best of all his friends.

It is because the friendship of utility, which Frodo had for Sam, is less similar to true friendship than the friendship of pleasure, which Sam had for Frodo; therefore it had to undergo a greater transformation to turn into a more valuable type.

Their Relationship after the War of the Ring Now that the Ring was destroyed and the victory appropriately celebrated, the four hobbits returned home to their old lifestyles. Or at least Frodo and Sam tried to pick up the old life, although it would never be the same because of all the things they have experienced. While Sam aligned to his previous life more easily, Frodo was affected by the long influence of his burden.

As a result, he again became withdrawn and did not speak about his feelings much, partially because he did not want to worry Sam. In addition, his own suffering has taught him how insignificant were many of the problems of his former life, or the current issues of his kinsmen. Consequently, he became almost a pacifist, for which Tom Shippey criticizes himp. And after a time being a Deputy Mayor, he completely withdrew from public life. Yet, at least the relationship between him and Sam retained its recently gained dimension.

So Sam now became an equal master of Bag End. Furthermore, in the end Frodo also named him his heir. Sam, who had become a respectable person, was happy because he could still stay near Frodo and attend to him. He even decided to name his first-born son after his master, as he still called him. However, there appeared an unexpected interference with their relationship.

It came out that, apart from friendly love to Frodo, he kept a romantic love for Rose Cotton, a hobbit girl from his neigbourhood, and his childhood friend.

This sudden romantic desire was quite surprising because he had never mentioned her until the third chapter of Book Six, when Sam remembered her for the first time. Presumably, it was the near-death experience as, thirsty and starving, he thought that he would certainly die even if the quest succeeded, that enhanced his love. And when they finally came home and saw what a mess there was, it seemed that he was unable to decide which one was more important for him at that moment, since Rosie was evidently willing to repay his affection.

He turned away and mounted his pony. But as he started off, Rosie ran down the steps. But take care of yourself, and come straight back as soon as you have settled the ruffians!

But Frodo knew that what Sam really desired was to live a peaceful life with his family, so he decided it for him. Self-sacrifice is the most virtuous demonstration of friendly love observable only within true friendship, and consequently every such friendship involves it at certain point, if the need arises.

Such is the nature of friendship. And because good men naturally seek only what is virtuous, they do not mind this, for it is the greatest virtue. Moreover, it is a way of gaining nobility.

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Therefore it is important to investigate how relevant that self-sacrifice was for their friendship. He feared going into unknown lands. He would have preferred staying at home, comfortable with his life, but he realized that the Ring presented too big a danger for his homeland and its people.

Because of that fear, he first tried to give the Ring to Gandalf, but when the wizard refused it, Frodo began to understand that he had no other choice if he wanted to protect the Shire folk, even though he was not always on friendly terms with some of them.

I feel that as long as the Shire lies behind, safe and comfortable, I shall find wandering more bearable: I shall know that somewhere there is a firm foothold, even if my feet cannot stand there again. Although this idea was actually uttered first by Bilbo, not Frodo. However, Frodo was, and so he must have felt the responsibility in his heart, unlike Bilbo.

So he gave up even this opportunity to stay in the Elven house of healing, and continued his struggle for the good of the Free Peoples of Middle-earth. But in both cases his motives were rather general. Therefore, his sacrifice was not relevant to his relationship to Sam.

All pleasures of his normal life were gradually replaced by pain and suffering, the psychological being worse than the physical. His mind was tormented by the will of the Ring; he constantly had to fight it. He lost his personal integrity. He actually sacrificed all his self in the quest.

And when he returned back to the Shire, he found out that his life would never be the same, because he would never be the same. He was not able to enjoy what he had sacrificed his life for. The security of his homeland, which was supposed to make his wandering bearable, did not make him confident anymore.

rotk ending a relationship

The impact of his decision was far greater than he expected. And although he would love to return to his previous life, to remain with friends and see them marry and raise children, it was impossible for him.

So in the end he had to give up even this, and depart from Middle-earth forever. It has been already noted that from the very beginning he had been determined even to die for Frodo in order to spare his master. It started off with an unanswered offering to carry more load instead of Frodo, which just hints at his readiness to surrender his personal comfort for the good of his friend, but it gradually increased in intensity and relevance.

But comparatively, he too sacrificed the pleasures of his life as he set out on the journey with Frodo, exchanging it for whole day tramping, sleeping in the wilderness for weeks without a soft bed or hot bath, hiding, and lacking enough to eat.

But since we are never told how big his affection for his homeland was, it is not certain whether leaving it meant any sorrow for him. He only regretted leaving it when he came back and found all the nice places he liked in ruin. The actual sacrifice resulting from his departure was having to postpone his aborning love for Rose, leaving her there without admitting his feelings to her and without any credible hope that he might ever return and see her again.

But his sacrifices became more demanding after the breaking of the Fellowship. At this moment he gave up the prospect of soon reaching a comfortable, safe place — meaning Minas Tirith — that would end this strenuous plodding, and continued on the journey with Frodo, which became even more grueling and perilous. And after they entered Mordor, Sam sacrificed his sleep in order to keep watch over his master.

He gave up his share of food so that Frodo could have more, and gave him most of the water, too, eating very little and thirsting. Or on a different occasion, he insisted on testing stream water they came upon in Mordor before Frodo could drink it, in case it was poisonous. But his sacrifice reached its peak in the last phase of their journey towards Mount Doom, when he carried Frodo up the slope of the mountain on his back.

In one other instance, his sacrifice also evoked a kind of miracle. He decided to carry the Ring onward and leave his beloved Frodo there. However, this reward was not without drawbacks. First, achieving the reconciliation was not effortless; Sam actually had to fight his way to save Frodo, although thanks to a strange turn of fortune, most of the enemies in the orc tower had been cleared off before he came there.

And second, the award was only momentary and would soon result in much grief for Sam. Yet the greatest sacrifice he had to undergo came only at the very end of the story. As it has been already noted, like Frodo had to leave what he loved and was fighting for—his country, Sam also had to leave and give up what he loved the most—his dearest friend, whom he had served so faithfully for so many years and for whom he suffered all this.

The departure was not as much of a sacrifice for Frodo, since he was going to the Undying Lands, which was something like a paradise, a place of ease, where his wounds would be healed. For since he had always been so devoted to Frodo, now he lost the purpose of his life.

It left an empty space in his heart, as depicted in the scene when he was coming home from the Grey Havens accompanied by Merry and Pippin. And although he too sailed to the West in his old age ibid. Is It True Friendship? As it has been just evinced, the relationship between Frodo and Sam did, over the course of time, naturally change and evolve.

It got perceptibly deeper, closer, and more intimate; it reached a new dimension. But what did it ultimately turn into? Aristotle distinguished three main types of friendship, the third being the friendship of virtue, also called the true friendship, which has so far been disregarded because the initial nature of their friendship did not fit it.

It has developed into something more. But can it be now labeled as true friendship? Now I will examine it, following the basic characteristics of true friendship that the philosopher provided. Neither Sam nor Frodo were compelled to become friends, nor did anyone command them to like each other.

And it was again their free choice to remain in the friendship, although in certain periods of time it was not very beneficial, especially for Sam. Their friendship also involved having similar personal characteristics, for they were both hobbits and all hobbits are much alike, preferring peaceful life, being often obstinate and unexpectedly courageous.

They also had some common interests, for instance, liking adventurous tales about foreign countries and peoples, and enjoying food. And later they both had a shared the aim to destroy the Ring.

But there are some distinguishable characteristics of true friendship that are not so easily identifiable within the relationship of these two hobbits and require a longer comment.

It may be objected that in the beginning their attitudes to each other represented the lower kinds of friendship inspired by usefulness, which contradicts this essential characteristic.

For, as he said, a friendship requires familiarity which, in turn, requires some time for the friends to know each other. And as they become better acquainted, their relationship can develop into a higher form of friendship. And this is what happened to Frodo and Sam. And it was only during the quest that it became apparent that he loved Frodo for his own sake. It was definitely not any longer for pleasure, because the journey gave him none, apart from visiting Elves.

He also had no advantage from coming with Frodo—only struggle, pain and the threat of death. Were the reasons for his friendship with Frodo different, he could have more easily stayed home and married Rosie. But it was his love for Frodo that prevented him from deserting his master.

And similarly, if Frodo loved Sam only because of the help he provided for him, he would probably not have tried to deter him from following him, but rather forced him to it. Most of the things Sam did for him Frodo could do on his own as well, so he was not dependent on Sam. The help and pleasure they provided for each other was then just a natural result of their friendship. It is because once you love someone for his sake, you wish him wellbeing and aim for it.

We see that Sam did exactly this. Of course, he cared for Sam. Moreover, it seemed to violate another important characteristic of true friendship, and that is equality.

Equality in friendship can be understood in two senses. First, it is meant as equality regarding their social statuses. Aristotle says that true friendship is very unlikely between persons who are not on the same hierarchic level.

That explains why at the beginning Frodo and Sam perceived their relationship differently, one basing it on utility and the other on pleasure. Being master and servant, they were contraries according to Aristotle, and followed distinct aims by their mutual interaction. But during the journey the social differences between them blurred.

In an unfamiliar environment where no one knew them and where everyone they met could be their possible enemy, living exactly the same lives of tramps and undertaking the same troubles, they became still more and more similar, which reflected also on their social roles.

Frodo stopped considering Sam as only a servant and treated him rather as a good friend. So it is that they were treated equally. And after the accomplishment of the quest, they were both celebrated as the greatest heroes of the war. After the scouring of the Shire, Sam was no longer a gardener, but a respectable person who would eventually become a Mayor, voted into that office six times.

So by this time it meets even this demand of true friendship. But the second sense of equality is more important for true friendship.

This other sense represents the same quantity of friendly deeds on both sides, and reciprocity. Sam did for Frodo a great deal more than Frodo did for Sam. So at this point their relationship fails to meet the demands of true friendship. Sauron's ambassador at the Black Gate. Sean Bean as Boromir: Faramir's older brother, who appears in a flashback to The Fellowship of the Ring when Pippin explains to Denethor that he died to save him and Merry; and very briefly in the Extended Edition as an illusion to Denethor, smiling and walking proudly towards him before vanishing.

Jackson also has another unofficial cameo, as Sam's hand stepping into view when he confronts Shelob. Jackson's children also cameo as Gondorian extras, while Christian Rivers played a Gondorian soldier guarding the Beacon Pippin lights, and is later seen wounded.

Please help by spinning off or relocating any relevant information, and removing excessive detail that may be against Wikipedia's inclusion policy. April Learn how and when to remove this template message As with all of Peter Jackson's movie adaptions of The Lord of the Rings, many events, timelines, and geographic distances are compressed or simplified. Most major events from the books are included leaving only a very few events from the novel omitted from the film; there are however some events in the film significantly altered from the novels as there are some events invented only in the film just as there are certain details in the film not present in the books.

The Return of the King. In the film, all journeys of the companions from Isengard to Minas Tirith are compressed and simplified, as the entire company travels from Isengard to Edoras and arrives there simultaneously to recuperate after the Battle of Helm's Deep. The sequence of the Paths of the Dead adds a conversation between Aragorn and the King of the Dead in the book the Dead don't speak at all and a scene where the companions must flee an avalanche of skulls, but leaves out the encounter with Baldor's skeleton.

In contrast to the book, the viewer doesn't get told what happened in Lebennin between Aragorn and the Corsairs of Umbar. The film version Extended Edition doesn't correspond with the map of Gondor, as the company sees a near river with Corsair ships immediately after leaving the Haunted Mountain.

In the book, the River Anduin lies several hundred miles farther east, requiring a much longer journey with the Army of the Dead following behind, bringing terror to the towns they pass along the way.

The basis of Elrond and Arwen 's subplot arguing about Arwen's fate is derived from the Appendices, but it is largely extended in the film, as is Arwen and Elrond's relevance to the story. Denethorthe Steward of Gondorwas a more tragic character in the book.

In the film, overwhelming grief over the death of Boromir has driven him to despair, and he has given up any hope of defeating Sauron before Gandalf arrives in Minas Tirith.

Thus, the muster of Gondor is absent from the film, and major captains and generals including Imrahil of the Tower Guard and the Knights of Dol Amroth are not present. In the book, he has already ordered the lighting of the beacons before Gandalf's arrival, while he refuses to light them in the film, and the sequence where Pippin secretly lights them himself was invented for the movie.

The Battle of the Pelennor Fields is also altered: With generals such as Forlong and Imrahil absent, Gandalf commands the defence of Minas Tirith owing to Denethor's despair. While Denethor gives command to Gandalf in the book, in this film Gandalf forcibly takes control after Denethor tells his men to flee rather than fight. The Orcs and Trolls also never get into the city in the book. The Witch-king enters and stands off against Gandalf before the Rohirrim arrive, but in the film Orcs invade the city after Grond breaks the Gate.

The confrontation takes place while Gandalf journeys to save Faramir, during which Gandalf has his staff broken in the film but not in the book. The Red Arrow brought by a messenger from Gondor to ask for aid is absent.

rotk ending a relationship

An unstoppable and invulnerable force, the Dead wipe out Sauron's forces. The Warden, the talk of Athelasthe comical conversation with the herb-master, the woman Ioreth and her saying about a King's healing hands and the subsequent realising of Aragorn's true identity are left out altogether.

In the film, Aragorn leads the entire remaining force of Rohan and Gondor's men to the Black Gate without incident. Frodo enters Shelob's lair alone in the film, whereas in the book he and Sam entered together. This was done to make the scene more horrific with Frodo being alone, and Sam's rescue at the last minute more dramatic.

Frodo and Sam’s Relationship in the Light of Aristotle’s Philia – Fellowship & Fairydust

Frodo's ordeal in the Tower of Cirith Ungol and subsequent rescue by Sam are also changed; in the bookFrodo is stripped, beaten, and cruelly interrogated by the Orcs, while in the film, he is tied up but only briefly threatened by an Orc moments before Sam's arrival. The reunion of Frodo and Sam in the film is also shorter and less emotional than in the book; rather than comforting the physically injured and severely traumatised Frodo as in the book, Sam, after killing the Orc that was threatening Frodo but had not struck him, briefly accepts his apology for having doubted him and returns the Ring to him before suggesting that they find some Orc clothing for Frodo to wear.

In the film, Sam also does not experience "delusions of grandeur" about what he could do if he took the Ring for himself, like he does in the book. Sam instead overcomes a very brief moment of temptation which, instead of stemming from thoughts of how he could use the Ring for himself, seems to come from his concern for Frodo and wish to reduce the Ring's harm to his friend by sharing the burden.

Also, in the film viewers do not know that Sam has the Ring until he gives it back to Frodo, whereas in the book the reader knows that Sam has the Ring. When Sam and Frodo are diverted into the Orc march in Mordor and are about to collapse, in the film's Extended Edition they start a fake combat between each other and thus provoke some chaos during which they manage to escape, instead of slipping off during a congestion caused by several armies trying to get through the narrow Isenmouthe, as told in the novel.

Gollum's fall into the lava of Mount Doom was also rewritten for the film, as the writers felt Tolkien's original idea Gollum simply slips and falls off was anti-climactic. Originally, an even greater deviation was planned: Frodo would heroically push Gollum over the ledge to destroy him and the Ring, but the production team eventually realised that it looked more like Frodo murdering Gollum.

As a result, they had Frodo and Gollum struggle for possession of the Ring and both slip over the edge by accident. There are several changes in the Battle of the Black Gate: Sauron himself would come out in physical form to battle Aragorn, who would only be saved by the destruction of the Ring.

rotk ending a relationship

Jackson eventually realised it ignored the point of Aragorn's true bravery in distracting Sauron's army against overwhelming odds, and a computer generated Troll was placed over footage of Sauron in the finished film. As in all of Jackson's Middle-earth adaptions, the eagles do not speak. During the Battle for Minas Tirith, the White Tree of Gondor is shown to bear one white blossom, thus blooming by itself at Aragorn's coronation. Thereby the film ignores the book's story where Gandalf and Aragorn find a seedling of the white tree up in the mountains and plant it in the courtyard in place of the still-dead tree.

Aragorn's coronation takes place in form of a great ceremony in the Citadel of Minas Tirith, opposed to the book, where Aragorn is crowned in his tent on the Pelennor Fields before entering the City. In the film, the Shire is virtually unchanged when they return, and their friends and neighbours seem unaware of the climactic events that have taken place outside of their borders.